Disneyland Annual Passport Price Over Time | Ultimate Guide

Price of Disneyland Annual Passport Over Time

Guests have enjoyed the benefits of a Disneyland Annual Passport (AP) since the Premium AP was created in 1984. To have a personal, year-long ticket to your backyard theme park is a special privilege few will soon forget.

However, this particular privilege does cost a few bucks, seemingly more so in recent years. Just how much has the price of Disneyland Annual Passports changed over the years?

Prices Of All Disneyland Annual Passports Over Time

DateSoCal Select APSoCal AP
November 2002 –$105
January 2004$99$129
October 2004$99$149
September 2005 $119$149
September 2006$124$154
September 2007$129$169
August 2008$134$174
August 2009$144$194
January 2010$169$219
August 2010$184$239
June 2011$199$269
January 2012$199$269
May 2012$269$329
June 2013$279$359
May 2014$289$379
February 2015$299$409
October 2015$329$459
February 2017$339$469
February 2018$369$499

 

DateDeluxe APPremium AP
1984$65
1985$85
1986$99
1987$140
2000$199
November 2002$165$225
January 2004$179$279
October 2004$209$329
September 2005$229$349
September 2006$239$359
September 2007$259$379
August 2008$269$389
August 2009$289$429
January 2010$299$439
August 2010$329$459
June 2011$379$499
January 2012$379$499
May 2012$469$649
June 2013$499$669
May 2014$519$699
February 2015$549$779
October 2015$599Cancelled
February 2017$619
February 2018$729

 

DateSignature APSignature Plus APPremier*
August 2010$700
June 2011$700
January 2012$749
May 2012$849
June 2013$979
May 2014$1,029
February 2015$1,099
October 2015$849$1,049$1,439
February 2017$849$1,049$1,439
February$999$1,149$1,579
* For ease of use, all prices for the Disney Premier Passport on this page do not include Florida sales tax. For more information on the current price and how tax is calculated for this passport, visit our Disney Premier Passport page.

Cost Of All Disneyland Annual Passports Adjusted For Inflation

How much have Disneyland AP’s really gone up in today’s money? In the tables below, you’ll find the cost of each AP, adjusted for inflation to the current year.

Disneyland APYear DebutedOriginal Price Adjusted to 2018Current Price
SoCal Select AP2003$135$369
SoCal AP2002$144$499
Deluxe AP2002$226$729
Signature AP2015$885$999
Signature Plus AP2015$1,093$1,149
Disney Premier2010$797$1,579

As you can see, the price of the SoCal Select, SoCal, and Deluxe Disneyland Annual Passport have at least doubled since they were introduced!

Annual Passport Change Over Time**
Disneyland APPrice IncreasePercent Change
SoCal Select AP+ $234+ 173%
SoCal AP+ $355+ 247%
Deluxe AP+ $503+ 223%
Signature AP+ $114+ 13%
Signature Plus AP+ $56+ 5%
Disney Premier+ $782+ 98%
**Adjusted for inflation.

The Disney Premier Passport has seen the largest overall dollar price increase in its years of existence, coming to more than twice what a Deluxe pass would cost by itself. Unsurprisingly, the Southern California AP has seen the largest percent increase with a gain of 247% when adjusted for inflation.

Current Disneyland Annual Passport Prices Versus Cost In 1955

After the opening of Disneyland in 1955, adult general admission to the park was $1 and a book of 8 A-C tickets sold for about $2.50. While there’s no exact comparison between that ticket system and today’s all-day, all-attraction ticket, I’ve thrown together some numbers below that equal a decent approximation of what one adult would pay for to ride all the attractions Disneyland had in 1955.

The full cost for an all-day, all-attraction trip to Disneyland in 1955 would have been $7.50 or about $68 in 2017. Below is a table relating the prices of today’s AP’s with what they would have cost when the park first opened.

Disneyland Annual PassportCurrent PricePrice in 1955 Dollars
SoCal Select AP$369$39.90
SoCal AP$499$53.95
Deluxe AP$729$78.82
Signature AP$999$108.01
Signature Plus AP$1,149$124.23
Disney Premier Passport$1,579$170.73

If Disney had sold a Southern California Select AP the year Disneyland opened, it would have taken you 6 all-attraction days to break-even. If they had a Signature AP in 1955, you’d have to visit more than 12 days to equal the cost in tickets.

Disneyland Annual Passport# Of Days To Break-Even In 1955# Of Days To Break-Even In 2017
SoCal Select AP55
SoCal AP76
Deluxe AP108
Signature AP1311
Signature Plus AP1615

It’s interesting to see that in some cases, the number of days to break-even on your Disneyland Annual Passport would’ve been higher in 1955 than in 2017. So much for the good old days!

Of course, to compare a day in the brand-new Disneyland of 1955 with the modern 2-park Disneyland Resort of today isn’t exactly fair. For one thing, parking was much cheaper in 1955 and the prices I used for today’s AP’s did not include this.

I just think it’s neat to look at the numbers, so the next time we lament about the over-expensive cost of today’s tickets and AP’s, we’ll know things haven’t changed all that much.

What are your thoughts? Do you think today’s AP’s are worth their current price? Let me know in a comment below. Thanks for reading and we’ll see ya’ real soon!

Wondering which annual pass to buy and when? Visit the
Mouse Monthly Ultimate Guide to Disneyland Annual Passports
for all your AP answers.


Join Our Family

Sign up for our FREE newsletter today and we’ll also send you a coupon for
10% OFF
in our store!

* indicates required

We value your privacy and guarantee no spam. Your information will never be shared.

5 Responses to “Disneyland Annual Passport Price Over Time | Ultimate Guide”

  1. Scott Simmons January 23, 2016 at 8:13 am #

    We were AP-holders since 1989. We were a family of 4. In recent years my son, now 22, lost interest in going all of the time. Is older sister, who was still living at home, was working at the park for a couple of years. That saved us the cost of 2 APs. We adopted one of our foster kids a couple of years ago so we were back to making monthly payments for 3 APs. We always opted for the Premium AP. The Deluxe didn’t make sense because once you added parking to it (when you still could) it was only a few dollars less than the Premium. We felt the extra discounts and extra days, especially around the holidays, were worth it. My daughter’s employment ended (long story) abruptly a month or so before our passes were to renew. The timing was convenient, because they had announced the ‘new’ Signature passes. The equivalent of the Premier (Sig+) was now going to be $1,049/yr. They force you to get at least the $849 AP to have parking included. You cannot add parking to the less expensive APs.

    What this all comes down to is we’re all Disneyed out.

  2. Rich November 1, 2015 at 6:41 am #

    Unbelievable! This is why I do not buy the pass any longer. How can anyone afford the passes now? With a family of four you are talking about over $4,000.00!

    • Alex Blasingame November 1, 2015 at 6:48 am #

      You’re right Rich, it is a lot! I’m lucky enough to live in Southern California, so my family buys less-expensive SoCal AP’s and finances them. The amount I pay will go up next year though, when my son turns 3. Without the ability to make payments, it would be more of a stretch for us.

  3. Sheila September 28, 2015 at 9:26 am #

    I just renewed my pass and updated it from Deluxe to Premium. I hate that this has gone up so much and if it goes up more then that I will probably go back to my Deluxe. I only went up to Premium because of the 24 hour event since I wasn’t able to go on Saturday this year and had to cut my trip short. Discount wise it makes up for the price there. I only have 8 more days to go until it’s paid for.

    • Alex Blasingame September 28, 2015 at 2:29 pm #

      Thanks for the comment, Sheila! The line between the Deluxe and Premium AP’s has really blurred in recent years. In fact, I’m writing a big article comparing the two passes in detail that you’d probably find interesting. I’ll be talking about it more in our weekly newsletter, if you’re a subscriber.

      I’m the 24 hour event was a blast! I still have to get to one. My family couldn’t/wouldn’t make it this year. There’s always next time.

Leave a Reply to Scott Simmons Click here to cancel reply.